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America at Home Press Room
Press Release (April 13, 2009 New York, NY)
AMERICA AT HOME: A Close-Up Look at How We Live for iEnvision

Press Images

Images may only be used for review purposes. All rights reserved.

© 2008 Joanna B. Pinneo / America At Home

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Westminster, Colorado: Residents of the new urbanist community of Bradburn Village believe in the power of porches, pedestrians, and parties—in this case, a weekly block party hosted by Petra Spiess and her husband, D.J.

© 2008 Betty Udesen / America At Home
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Olympia, Washington: Fairy trailer. Dee Williams wanted a simpler, greener life—so she built her dream house, an 84-square-foot cottage on wheels, which is currently parked in a friend's backyard. Not only did she save money using salvaged materials (the front door came from a dumpster, for instance), but the entire house is small enough to fit into a standard parking spot. Says Williams, "Right now, there's nowhere else I want to be."

© 2008 Brian Lanker / America At Home
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Eugene, Oregon: Transported tradition. Hispanic Americans are the fastest-growing minority segment of the U.S. population. Here, wearing traditional Mexican dresses, sisters Irene and Araceli Guzman and Claudia Pelayo practice for a dance performance'while little brother Fernando Pelayo, dressed in his traditional charro suit (used by mariachis), looks on. Their father, Fernando Guzman, came to the United States 13 years ago as a construction worker. Now a contractor, he built the home behind them.

© 2008 Tim Klein / America At Home
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Tinley Park, Illinois: Virtual homeroom. Ortensia Ontiveros begins each day of homeschooling by joining her online classmates in the pledge of allegiance. Ortensia says her favorite part of the school day is learning about Jesus. Surveys of homeschooling families have found that more than a third do so for religious reasons. The most popular reason for homeschooling, at nearly 50 percent, is for better-quality education.

© 2008 Yoni Brook / America At Home
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New York, New York: Seeing through the clutter. Though his landlord has tried to evict him many times over the past 40 years, Steve Fybish, 70, has endured in his Upper West Side apartment. A weather historian and substitute teacher, Fybish passes his time playing the violin and thinking of his late wife, whose ashes lie in an urn somewhere amid the books and papers. Each year the National Association of Professional Organizers receives an estimated 10,000 calls from clutter victims desperate for someone to help them create order out of chaos.

© 2008 Annie O'Neill / America At Home
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McMurray, Pennsylvania: Threshold. Elise and Aidan Dowdall spend every summer moment in their backyard playhouse. The $10,000, 90-square-foot miniature manor has sponge-painted walls, simulated hardwood floors, electricity, and a sleeping loft. But when it gets dark, the siblings still prefer their own beds at home.

© 2008 Carlos Ortiz / America At Home
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Chili, New York: Ready teddies. Janice Hanson, 57, sorts through the collection of teddy bears in her living room near Rochester, New York. Hanson caught the bear-collecting bug from two of her friends back in 1970 and has been acquiring ever since. "When I die, I want people to take care of them," she says, then laughs. "Some friends have already picked out the ones they want." Hanson admits that she has lost count of how many she has, "but just looking at them all brings a smile to my face."

© 2008 Mike Hettwer / America At Home
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Chicago, Illinois: Bleacher bums. Virtually every house on Waveland Avenue across from Wrigley Field sports some kind of seating so that fans (and their friends) can catch a view of their beloved Cubs. On this night the Cubs were mounting a late-season playoff drive'but, as the fatalistic fans had come to expect, the team lost 5-2.

© 2008 Rick Smolan / America At Home
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East Hampton, New York: Grandpop knows best. Ever since they were toddlers, the first thing that Phoebe and Jesse Smolan, 7 and 5, do when they arrive at their grandfather's Long Island home is to climb into the painted school lockers to see how much they've grown since their last visit. A scrapbook kept by Grandpop Elliott Erwitt, a renowned photographer whose images appear on the walls of museums around the world, lets them chart their growth.

© 2008 Mike Yoder / America At Home
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Manhattan, Kansas: Daddy, can you hear me? Laura Cummings and her two daughters'Emily, 8, left, and Meredith, 4, right'sit down to dinner with an enlarged photo cutout of husband and father Major Brent Cummings. Until he returns from his 15-month tour in Iraq, this Flat Daddy image, made from a photo he sent them in February 2007, will have to suffice.

© 2008 Deanne Fitzmaurice / America At Home
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Newman, California: A new pattern. Days before her marriage ceremony, Monica Yatin Patel and her father gather with nearly 100 female relatives and friends in their living room for a pithi ceremony. As the guests sing and dance, Patel's skin is rubbed with chickpea flour, turmeric, and rosewater to make it glow, and henna decorations are painted on her hands and feet. In the Hindu religion, though the groom may visit, the bride is now not allowed out of her house until she is married.

© 2008 Ben Garvin / America At Home
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Ham Lake, Minnesota: Riveting tale. Anna Couwenhoven, 3, sits in her mother Ann's lap as they read a book together. Looking on are Noah, 8; Micah, 6; and Phillip, 3. Five of Ann and husband Russ's ten children were adopted, some from the United States, some from Ethiopia. Says Ann, "After our first adoption we felt like we had been trained. So we started seeking more children. God was telling us to adopt older kids." God also had a surprise waiting, Ann says. "While filing paperwork for our last adoption, I found out I was pregnant."

© 2008 Deanne Fitzmaurice / America At Home
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Eugene, Oregon: Lunch formation. When Bill Barrett first met his future wife, Christy, he thought she was kidding when she said she wanted 12 children. Now, after the couple has had 4 children of their own and adopted 12 more, Bill finally understands Christy's mission: finding families for needy kids. When she isn't looking after her own brood, she works with local social services to speed up the adoption process by having professional photographers shoot evocative portraits of children. These elegant photos replace the traditional mugshots and give prospective parents a sense of each child's personality. The images can be viewed at Christy's "Heart Gallery."

© 2008 Michael Appleton / America At Home
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New York, New York: Mobile home. Peabody "Cowboy" Dennis, a Vietnam veteran who has lived on the streets for more than four years, smokes a pipe before going to sleep. Each night he meticulously rebuilds his shelter'then, in the morning, disassembles it to meet city regulations. A growing number of cities have instituted similar laws, aimed at preventing permanent homeless camps while recognizing the need for nightly shelter. The homeless population in America is estimated at more than 3 million, half of them men.

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